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Certification Symbols

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SNAKE OIL AND SNAKE OIL SELLERS:

Marketers and manufacturers are working hard to deceive consumers to make their product appear as something it really is not.  More than 98% of supposedly “natural” products in the US are making potentially false or misleading claims, according to a study performed by TerraChoice, an environmental consulting firm.  See TerraChoice’s 7 Sins of Greenwashing Report.  Reading the fine print on labels will not necessarily help either. Companies are not required to disclose the use of some substances believed to be dangerous.  So, it is our duty as consumers to educate ourselves and be able to find the 2% of products that are actually natural.

Look out for the logos below to help ensure higher organic or natural beauty product standards. beware of copycat logos!

Best online source for ecolabel info : 

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Scroll down for COSMETICS  &  SKIN CARE SPECIFIC  CERTIFICATIONS

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ORGANIC AGRICULTURE CERTIFICATIONS

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USDA Organic is a government standard from the United States Department of Agriculture. It covers organic certification within cosmetics ingredients.
www.usda.gov (5 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

What does “Organic” mean?
Products that are Certified Organic by a USDA Accredited Certifying Agent means that some or all of the ingredients were produced under the guidelines of the National Organic Program (NOP).

Are there different levels of Organic Certification?
There are four levels of USDA Certification:

LEVEL 1:

100% Organic: All ingredients (not counting added water and salt) must be 100% organically produced. Products labeled 100% Organic may use the USDA Organic seal.

LEVEL 2:

Certified Organic: 95 – 99.9% of ingredients (not counting added water or salt) must be produced organically. May contain up to 5% of non-organically produced agricultural ingredients which are not commercially available in organic form, and/or other substances as allowed by law. Products labeled 95 – 99.9% Organic may use the USDA Organic seal.

LEVEL 3:

Made With Organic Ingredients: 70 – 94.9% of ingredients must be produced organically. May contain up to 30% of non-organically produced agricultural ingredients which are not commercially available in organic form, and/or other substances as allowed by law.

LEVEL 4:

Organic Ingredients denoted with an asterisk in ingredients list: contains less than 70% of organically produced ingredients.

A 5-Star Comparison and Ranking of Organic Certifiers

Is “organic” the same as “natural”?
While some manufacturers use these terms interchangeably, they are not the same. As described above, products labeled “Organic” have to meet the strict guidelines of the USDA. “Natural” typically refers to ingredients derived from plants, minerals or algae, but these are not regulated by the USDA nor the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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OTCO color logo

Oregon Tilth is one of the USDA NOP accredited certifiers. They certify to the standard of the USDA. Oregon Tilth is a U.S. nonprofit research and education membership organization dedicated to biologically sound and socially equitable agriculture. A world leader in organic certification from soil to store, Tilth is noted for the integrity of the Oregon Tilth Certified Organic label (OTCO). Oregon Tilth advocates a holistic approach to agricultural production systems, and publishes In Good Tilth, a newsletter covering issues on sustainable and organic agriculture. It provides USDA organic certification services to organic growers, processors, and handlers internationally.  tilth.org (5 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

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The Certified Naturally Grown (CNG) program is administered by an executive director and a Farmers Advisory Committee made up of natural, sustainable farmers from around the country.Diverse crops mean significant record-keeping burdens, as each crop requires a paper-trail from purchase of seed to sale of every pound of produce. Extensive paperwork, plus high certification fees, make it unlikely if not impossible for many small farms to become certified organic. Some of the nation’s best organic farmers are ironically no longer able to call themselves “organic” anymore!  Certified Naturally Grown provides these small, local growers with an alternative label and certification system that consumers can quickly come to trust and understand.  Most organic food you buy in a grocery store is produced by corporations that are more interested in earning profits than producing safe, sustainably grown food for their local community. The biggest organic food companies are now owned by Dole, Kraft, General Mills, Unilever and even Coca Cola!

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Soil Association Requires 95% organic content for an outright “Organic” product claim and 70% content for a “made with Organic” claim. But not as high as USDA or NSF because allows certain synthetic preservatives like Phenoxyethanol even in “Organic” products, and Cocamidopropyl Betaine is a primary cleanser that is composed in part from petrochemical material that SA allows. But SA does prohibit sulfation and “generic” hydrogenation of ingredients.A pretty decent standard, much better than Ecocert or Natrue as far as European standards. Brands which certify to this standard and are available at  BigGreenSmile.com include Bentley OrganicsNatracare and Balm Balm.   www.soilassociation.org (3 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

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Biodynamic / Demeter Demeter International has been in use since 1928 and this label is still regarded as providing the highest standards for organic food in the world. is an organic standard association based on biodynamic agriculture systems founded by Rudolph Steiner. It focuses on natural rather than synthetic fertilisers, and crops are produced holistically with the help of traditional knowledge, time and astrological consideration. Weleda is one example brand that is certified by the Demeter symbol.  www.demeter.net

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Ecocert is a control and certification organisation, whose activities are governed accordingly by the public authorities and legislation.  They are approved by the USDA as certifying body for the NOP (New Organic Program) and by MAFF for JAS in Japan, as well as being approved by many countries on the basis of national regulations.  France-based, www.ecocert.com

OASIS organic and sustainable standard.

OASIS is the most permissive US standard as far as synthetic preservative allowances, including phenoxyethanol and ethylhexylglycerin, yet purports to certify outright “Organic” product claims at only 85% organic content, with no requirement that main cleansing ingredients such as sulfated surfactants be made from organic material. It is a certification created by big business to make it easier to call products Organic. A more permissive version of the NSF standard, and instead of appropriately restricting to only “made with Organic” claims, certifies bogus outright “Organic” claims. Allows sulfation, hydrogenation and synthetic preservation of ingredients. Highly misleading to organic consumers looking for organic personal care. (half star standard (ouch!) according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

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MORE ORGANIC SYMBOLS AROUND THE WORLD

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OneCert

One Cert International Organic Standards includes USDA National  Organic Program (NOP). European Organic Regulations (EU 2092/91). Japan Agricultural Standards (JAS). Quebec Organic Reference Standard (CAAQ). Bio Suisse Standards. IFOAM Basic Standards.Based in Nebraska USA One Cert

IFOAM logo.

Europe — IFOAM International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements

QAI logo.

Quality Assurance International (QAI, Inc.) provides certification in Canada, U.S., Japan and the European Union.

Australian Certified Organic logo

Australian Certified Organic (ACO) and

Biological Farmers of Australia logo

Biological Farmers of Australia (BFA)

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PGS Label

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Participatory Guarantee System (PGS) India is an organic quality assurance system [like ISO 9000] implemented and controlled by the committed organic farmer-producers. The International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements or IFOAM defines PGS thus: “Participatory Guarantee Systems are locally focused quality assurance systems. They certify producers based on active participation of stakeholders and are built on a foundation of trust, social networks and knowledge exchange.

Switzerland re-inspects everything and labels with bio.inspecta. Take note USA! This is their symbol for the Inspection and certification of USDA ORGANIC products.bio-inspecta.ch

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BioSuisse has developed specific guidelines for organic products marketed in Switzerland and has registered the “Bud/BioSuisse” brand to distinguish those products.  To export products with Bio Suisse brand to Switzerland it is necessary to demonstrate to have a potential Swiss importer, because only the importer can become a licensee of Bio Suisse and put the “Bud” brand on the products.

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Bio Siegel is the national logo used since 2001 by Germany to recognise organic productions.  For processed products it’s possible to use “Bio Siegel” logo only when at least 95% of the total  ingredients from agricultural origin are organic. www.bio-siegel.de

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Naturland is one of the main association on ecological culture in Germany. Processors operating under Naturland apply to more severe standards than those described by EU regulation. Naturland standards include requirements of social responsibility. ICEA is one of the few Italian control bodies  allowed to carry out inspections relevant to the issue of certification and brand release, which must be requested directly to the German office of the association (www.naturland.de).

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AB” brand (Agriculture Biologique) is a property of the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food, Fishing and Rural Development. This brand may be requested by French  clients to distinguish organic agricultural products, since 65% of the French consumers recognize organic products from this logo on the package. Processed goods (food or fodder) can expose this brand only when containing a percentage of organic agricultural ingredients over 95% (same condition to use EU logo).
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Krav is the main organic certification body of Sweden, and products marked with its logo are very well known and appreciate on the Swedish market thanks to the high level of guarantee offered. ICEA is a control body recognized by Krav and, upon its request,  will carry out the necessary  inspections  to verify the respect of these specific standards and the correct use of Krav logo.

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EU organic production, inspection and certification. The production rules for EU organic production and for inspection and certification have been laid down in the EEC Regulation No. 834/2007 and 889/2008 and in their amendments. This Regulation is in force within the European Union countries, but also sets criteria for importing organic products from outside the European Union.

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Japanese Organic Law Standards. Production rules for organic production according to Japanese requirements have been laid down in the Japanese Agricultural Standards. The regulations are in force within Japan, but also set criteria for importing organic products to Japan.

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ACO stands for the Australian Certified Organic and is recognised by the Bud logo and accredits organic operations, appearing on around 70% of all certified organic products in Australia, including exported products. Miessence is ACO certified.
www.australianorganic.com.au

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BIOLOGICO DI FATTORIA (FARM ORGANIC) is an Italian certification logo for packaged food products “from organic farming” whose production cycles are completed within a single farm.  Production and processing of the product must necessarily take place within the same farm.

ICEA, the Ethical and Environmental Certification Institute, based in Bologna, Italy, inspects and certifies firms respectful for the environment, workers’dignity and collective rights.  With more than 300 experts inspecting over 11 thousands firms, from its 17 branches throughout Italy and 7 abroad, ICEA is one of the most prominent inspection and certification bodies in the field of sustainable development http://www.icea.info

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Nature et Progres products utilize a minimum of 95% certified organic ingredients, with the remaining 0 to 5% being of organic source but sufficiently modified as to not be certifiable as organic.  Prohibited ingredients include: synthetic dyes,   synthetic preservatives (parabens), synthetic fragrances, synthetic antioxidants, synthetic emollients, synthetic oils and fats, synthetic polymers, silicones, paraffin, all ingredients issued by the petrochemical industry. Nature et Progrès is one of the oldest PGS in the world, functioning without discontinuity since 1972. . Nature et Progrès still operates as a PGS, with its own private organic standard, its own certification procedures (involving peer review and consumers in the inspection process) but is not allowed to call its products “organic” (“biologique” in French) due to the third party certification requirements of the EU regulation.  The Nature et Progrès label is still recognized positively by many organic consumers, but organic shops are starting to refuse the N&P products, and younger generations are less aware of the history and values of N&P, leading many of the N&P producers to be also third party certified so as to be able to access markets.  http://www.natureetprogres.org

ETKO is active in Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Ukraine, Russia and Azarbaidjan. In 2003 accreditation was given by the USDA USA for NOP certification and 2003 by Canada for CAAQ Standards certification. ETKO certifies several products including; food, textile, leather, cosmetics, farm inputs, textile inputs, wild collection crops, cleaning material, restaurants and catering facilities.  etko.org

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Switzerland Inspection and certification of imports. (just example of re-inspection process for switzerland)

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COSMETICS  &  SKIN CARE SPECIFIC  CERTIFICATIONS

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NATRUE

  • NO SYNTHETIC FRAGRANCES AND COLOURS
  • NO PETROLEUM DERIVED PRODUCTS (Parafines, PEG, -propyle-, -alkyle-, etc.)
  • NO SILICON OILS AND DERIVATIVES
  • NO GENETICALLY MODIFIED INGREDIENTS (based on EU rules)
  • NO IRRADIATION OF END PRODUCT AND BOTANICAL INGREDIENTS
  • PRODUCTS MAY NOT BE TESTED ON ANIMALS
  • THREE LEVELS OF CERTIFICATION
  • » NATURAL COSMETICS


Ingredients must be natural but they do not have to be organic
(from organic cultivation).

This level is the foundation of the NATRUE-Label: it defines which ingredients are permitted and how they may be processed. Products of the other two levels need to fulfil the criteria of this level first.

In respect of nature, natural ingredients may only be processed with soft production processes. Per product type, there is a minimum threshold for natural ingredients and a maximum threshold for derived natural substances.

  • » NATURAL COSMETICS WITH ORGANIC PORTION


These are natural cosmetics with ingredients of organic origin:
at least 70% of natural ingredients must stem from controlled
organic production and/or controlled wild collection.

Compared to the first level, we require higher minimum levels of natural ingredients and lower maximum of derived natural ingredients.

  • ORGANIC COSMETICS –


Organic Cosmetics must have at least 95 % of natural ingredients from controlled organic cultivation and/or controlled wild collection.

Compared to the second level, we require higher minimum levels of natural ingredients and lower maximum of derived natural ingredients.  

In addition, minimum levels for natural ingredients are even higher than for the second grade. Only a few product categories can attain this level, based on current scientific knowledge. Attaining this level is a real challenge for manufacturers.

logo BDIH

(2.5 star) BDIH is a label from Germany from the Association of German Industries and Trading Firms -regulates health care products, food supplements and personal hygiene products, including cosmetics who guarantee natural cosmetics standards. Natural only (No Organic requirements). But even though it does not have any organic content requirements, and is only a “natural” standard, it disallows any petrochemicals in cleansing ingredients, and allows only a few nature-identical synthetic preservatives.  To gain BDIH certification, brands must use natural – not synthetic – raw materials (plant oils, herbal extracts, essential oils, fats and waxes).  No synthetic perfumes and color additives, no irradiation, no GMO, no animal testing. The positive list is the basis of the label.  The ecological impact of each product also plays an important role in certification.  It is a list of authorized ingredients : 690 components on the 20 000 existing used for cosmetics. If a product contains only 1 un-authorized ingredient it cannot obtain the BDIH label.  Most importantly, it does not certify any bogus “organic” claims. Allows sulfation, hydrogenation and certain synthetic preservation of ingredients.  . More than 2,000 natural cosmetics are certified BDIH in Europe and North America

www.kontrollierte-naturkosmetik.de/e/index_e.htm

Biodynamic
The biodynamic movement is holistic in its approach to farming and food production. No artificial fertilizers or pesticides are used. Instead, farmers seek to achieve a natural harmony with the earth through an acute awareness of how weather and climate patterns and elements of nature (like the sun, earth, and air) work together to create a harmonious balance.

Brands Weleda, Primavera, and Dr. Hauschka use biodynamic ingredients and are certified by the Demeter International Association.

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Soil Association Requires 95% organic content for an outright “Organic” product claim and 70% content for a “made with Organic” claim. But not as high as USDA or NSF because allows certain synthetic preservatives like Phenoxyethanol even in “Organic” products, and Cocamidopropyl Betaine is a primary cleanser that is composed in part from petrochemical material that SA allows. But SA does prohibit sulfation and “generic” hydrogenation of ingredients.A pretty decent standard, much better than Ecocert or Natrue as far as European standards. Brands which certify to this standard and are available at  BigGreenSmile.com include Bentley OrganicsNatracare and Balm Balm.   www.soilassociation.org (3 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

Natural Products Association/NPA (US) Natural only (No Organic requirements). Very similar to BDIH,  (at one time, not quite as rigorous in phase 1, when there was tempoarary allowance for synthetic quaternary compounds (hair conditioners) and synthetic preservatives, but these sunsetted May 1, 2010, when NPA becomes more or less completely identical to BDIH). Most importantly NPA does not certify any bogus organic claims. (2.5 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

USDA Organic is a government standard from the United States Department of Agriculture. It covers organic certification within cosmetics ingredients.
www.usda.gov (5 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

What does “Organic” mean?
Products that are Certified Organic by a USDA Accredited Certifying Agent means that some or all of the ingredients were produced under the guidelines of the National Organic Program(NOP).

Are there different levels of Organic Certification?
There are four levels of USDA Certification:

LEVEL 1:

100% Organic: All ingredients (not counting added water and salt) must be 100% organically produced. Products labeled 100% Organic may use the USDA Organic seal.

LEVEL 2:

Certified Organic: 95 – 99.9% of ingredients (not counting added water or salt) must be produced organically. May contain up to 5% of non-organically produced agricultural ingredients which are not commercially available in organic form, and/or other substances as allowed by law. Products labeled 95 – 99.9% Organic may use the USDA Organic seal.

LEVEL 3:

Made With Organic Ingredients: 70 – 94.9% of ingredients must be produced organically. May contain up to 30% of non-organically produced agricultural ingredients which are not commercially available in organic form, and/or other substances as allowed by law.

LEVEL 4:

Organic Ingredients denoted with an asterisk in ingredients list: contains less than 70% of organically produced ingredients.

A 5-Star Comparison and Ranking of Organic Certifiers

Is “organic” the same as “natural”?
While some manufacturers use these terms interchangeably, they are not the same. As described above, products labeled “Organic” have to meet the strict guidelines of the USDA. “Natural” typically refers to ingredients derived from plants, minerals or algae, but these are not regulated by the USDA nor the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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OTCO color logo

Oregon Tilth is one of the USDA NOP accredited certifiers. They certify to the standard of the USDA. Oregon Tilth is a U.S. nonprofit research and education membership organization dedicated to biologically sound and socially equitable agriculture. A world leader in organic certification from soil to store, Tilth is noted for the integrity of the Oregon Tilth Certified Organic label (OTCO). Oregon Tilth advocates a holistic approach to agricultural production systems, and publishes In Good Tilth, a newsletter covering issues on sustainable and organic agriculture. It provides USDA organic certification services to organic growers, processors, and handlers internationally.  tilth.org (5 star standards according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

Whole Foods Premium Body Care Seal
Look for the premium Body Care seal on more than 1,200 products offered in the Whole Body section of your local Whole Foods store. Whole Foods regulates their own self-certification of cosmetic products that contain safe, gentle ingredients and are free from synthetic dyes and fragrances and harsh chemicals. Sunscreen is made with chemical-free alternatives zinc oxide and titanium oxide.

Organic Cosmetic Certification Standard. Canada. Natural and Organic, 95% plant ingredients certified organic. No parabens, DEA, TEA, Olefin Sulfonate, Cocamidopropyl betaine, Sodium Myreth Sulfate, GMO, synthetic ingredients,  No animal testing. No Deterpenation, Ethoxylation, Irradiation, Sulphonation, Ethylene Oxide treatments, Mercury Treatmentsstrict conformance to the principles, guidelines, and regulations already in existence internationally:

USDA National Organic Program Standards 7 CFR Part 205
California Health and Safety Code, Article 7 “The California Organic Products Act of 2003”
Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (Canada)
Canadian Food and Drugs Act
FDA/CFSAN Cosmetics Good Manufacturing Practice guideline
CAN/CGSB 32.310 2006 Organic Production Systems General Principles and Management Standards
EEC Regulation number 2092/91
ISO 9001 Quality Management Systems – Requirements
ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems – Requirements



The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, Cofounded by the U.S. Environmental Working Group, is a national  coalition of  nonprofit U.S.  health and environmental organizations.  Campaign for Safe Cosmetics

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NSF Personal Care Logo

(3.5 star) Not implimented yet, NSF/ANSI 305 is a new U.S. standard for organic personal care and beauty products. Only a few nature-identical synthetic preservatives allowed; no petrochemicals in major cleansing ingredients; appropriately limits label claims to “made with organic [specified ingredients]” due to allowances for processes like hydrogenation and sulfation; 70% organic minimum. The NSF standard is basically a responsible compromise worked out between organic consumers/producers and the cosmetic industry, where the outright “USDA Organic” product category is not messed around with, that reflects core organic consumer criteria that “organic” products not include hydrogenated, sulfated or synthetically preserved ingredients. Instead, the additional allowances for processes like hydrogenation, sulfation and synthetic preservation are restrained to the “made with Organic” claim space for personal care under NSF.The “Contains Organic Ingredients” seal gives manufacturers an alternative to the USDA’s organic seal which is applicable only to products that are made up of agricultural ingredients and demands 95 % organic ingredients. – Will be featured in the  upcoming Sustainable Cosmetics Summit, taking place in New York on 24-26th March 2010

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OCA’s Coming Clean Campaign for organic integrity. No Faux organic cosmetics! Cracking down on fake organic products. The Organic Consumers Organization is asking the USDA stop companies from mislabeling  products by requiring the word “organic” be backed up by USDA certification. Over 600 organic businesses have signed on to support this campaign (see a list of supporting businesses here. If you are a personal care producer or retailer and would like to support OCA’s Coming Clean Campaign, click here.

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Green Beauty Labels and Terms to Look For

Paraben/Phthalates/PCB-free
Contains no traces of these harsh chemicals. Parabens and phthalates are found in the ingredient list of a product, while PCBs can be found in the plastic of the product’s container.

IOS Natural & Organic Cosmetic Standard
In 2008, independent certification company Certech Registration Inc. introduced natural and organic certification for cosmetic products in North America.

The IOS Natural & Organic Cosmetic certification requires that all food ingredients be organic and that the company follow a strict set of eco-friendly guidelines, including use of recycled and fair trade materials and production methods with small environmental impact. The first IOS Natural & Organic certified company, Eaurganic, launched in 2008

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logo ecocert cosmetique bio.

EcoCert Organic label Level 1 minimum 95% of natural ingredients (includes water), minimum 95% of organic certified ingredients on the total plant ingredients and minimum 10% of organic certified ingredients on total ingredients.  http://www.ecocert.com/-Cosmetics-.html

logo ecocert cosmetique eco.

Ecocert Eco label : Cannot be considered organic: 50 to 94 % of total ingredients from organic agriculture and 95% of plant ingredients. Both the most permissive and misleading standard out there, allowing various petrochemicals in main cleansing ingredients as well as synthetic preservatives no one else does, yet certifies outright “Organic” product claims on products with as low as 10% organic content. Highly misleading to organic consumers. http://www.ecocert.com/-Cosmetics-.html (0 star standard (ouch!) according to the Organic Consumers Organization)

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Certification of Environment-Friendly Cosmetics. Based in Bologna, Italy, ICEA and AIAB, in cooperation with a group of producers, prepared a  Standard for Environment-friendly Cosmetics . ICEA makes available not only the List of certified products and producers, but also theINCI List of Ingredients for every product. No mutually recognized standards exist at international or European level for the “environment-friendly cosmetics” sector.

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Cosmebio is not a certifying body.  Cosmébio is a  French based not-for-profit association of natural and organic skin care/cosmetic manufacturers.Cosmébio cosmetics must be previously certified by Ecocert or Qualité France before they can join. www.cosmebio.org

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label nature et progrès cosmétique bio écologique

Nature et Progres is a very strict label:  Indeed, to obtain the label :  100% of the plants must be organic certified,  plant supplying must respect fair trade principles. Products utilize a minimum of 95% certified organic ingredients, with the remaining 0 to 5% being of organic source but sufficiently modified as to not be certifiable as organic. Prohibited ingredients include: synthetic dyes, synthetic preservatives (parabens), synthetic fragrances, synthetic antioxidants, synthetic emollients, synthetic oils and fats, synthetic polymers, silicones, paraffin, all ingredients issued by the petrochemical industry. Nature et Progrès is one of the oldest PGS in the world, functioning without discontinuity since 1972. . Nature et Progrès still operates as a PGS, with its own private organic standard, its own certification procedures (involving peer review and consumers in the inspection process) but is not allowed to call its products “organic” (“biologique” in French) due to the third party certification requirements of the EU regulation.  The Nature et Progrès label is still recognized positively by many organic consumers, but organic shops are starting to refuse the N&P products, and younger generations are less aware of the history and values of N&P, leading many of the N&P producers to be also third party certified so as to be able to access markets.  http://www.natureetprogres.org

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ORGANIC TEXTILE STANDARDS CERTIFICATION

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Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS) is quickly becoming becoming the basic tool for an international common understanding of environmental friendly production systems and social accountability in the organic textile sector. global-standard.org

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Organic Exchange Certification is the international cotton industry’s answer to growing consumer demands for responsible and sustainable organic cotton cultivation and blended yarn production.  Organic Exchange Certification

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CRUELTY FREE SYMBOL

While animal testing and cruelty has been banned in the UK and Europe since 1998, there are still an estimated 180 million animals that are used in experiments every year around the world. The following symbols protect the rights of animals and ensure that no animal derivatives are used within beauty products, whether they are organic, natural or not. Some brands may use both an animal and organic/natural standard as extra guarantee.

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The leaping bunny logo is an international independent symbol for cruelty free products. Avalon Organics, Burt’s Bees and Jason Natural Cosmetics are example brands that wear the bunny logo.
www.leapingbunny.org

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The Vegan Society is a UK based membership organisation that allows brands that have vegan products and are cruelty free to carry its logo. Incognito is one brand example that is registered by the Vegan Society.
www.vegansociety.com

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Certification Symbols

  1. I am ISO9000/ISO22000/HACCP Auditor, i need more information about organic certification body, certification process and …
    please send me by gms_int_co@yahoo.com
    thanks

    Posted by Davood Ghasemzadeh | July 31, 2010, 7:17 am

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Organic Certification: Industry Standards, Non-Profit Organizations, and Greenwashing « Forever Sustainable - April 18, 2011

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